#Hashtags... Absurd or Awesome? Jimmy and JT Break it Down for Us

September 26, 2013

Did you catch the new skit with Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake acting out a conversation spoken in “tweet?” #amazing. Jimmy and JT took a casual conversation to a whole new level, speaking out loud in the way many people write on their social media channels, to show just how silly we can sound.

The way we communicate online has certainly changed with the introduction and dare we say, overuse of hashtags. Are we really part of a bigger #conversation or are we just using this new vernacular out of a #need to be #modern and #connected?

The skit points out how ridiculous we would sound IF we spoke in the same way we tweet… or did they? Some online commenters cited how they know people who do just this and that the hand gesture for the hashtag already exists in real conversation. #seriously?

Many of us use hashtags for professional reasons as well as personal. They certainly have their place and with benefits for both. It can be a valuable tool to show metrics for a specific idea, campaign or brand and a great way to find topics with a common interest.

After we have good laugh and post the video to our Facebook pages, let’s try not to lose the message bestowed by the genius of Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake -- that we should use hashtags responsibly and try not to overuse them, in effort to not sound ridiculous.

The #NYWICI Hot Sheet Wants to Know:

  • Do hashtags make people sound inarticulate?
  • Is this a passing fad or is it the tip of the iceberg for us being micro-connected?
  • What are some best practices for people who like to use hashtags?

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